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Archive for August, 2013|Monthly archive page

Automation & Your Skills

In Design Methodologies, Education on August 12, 2013 at 12:24 AM

During my undergraduate studies, when I first went to a workshop of carpentry, sheet-metal etc. where they teach you how to work with wood and metal and how to make different shapes and objects with them, I did not understand why an Electronics & Communication engineering major was supposed to learn those things. I am sure that there are many who will question that way and this debate will probably never end.  Probably, the best learning outcome of such an exercise is the improvement in our abilities to focus, concentrate, be precise and measure accurately. Also, it helps develop a sense for working with limited resources. After all the quantity of wood or metal that each student is given can be limited and one has to ensure that one gets the work done with that limited quantity. Perhaps such learning exercises should be promoted by also focusing on these learning outcomes.

In today’s world of complex manufacturing, computer aided design tools and computer aided manufacturing have taken over such manual tasks. Once can define and draw any shape using sophisticated design tools and have it carved out by a computer aided manufacturing machine. While these computer aided tools came into existence to deal with complex shapes as well as with the increasing scale of manufacturing, they do not let you have the experience of working with your own hands. So it is quite possible that someone adept at using these computer tools, will fail to bend a sheet of metal at a perfect 90 degrees. So what can be a not so promising consequence of this? Excessive reliance on automation even for simple tasks may lead to a loss of such basic skills. At the same time you run the risk of being unproductive when such computer tools shut down for some reason even if the work does not really require them. Automation is intended to reduce time and manage complexity and scale of operations. It is not supposed to replace acquiring skills by hand where possible.

Another example would be tools like Maple and Mathematica. These are extremely powerful tools to solve mathematical problems. Would you stop learning how to solve a differential equation or how to calculate the area of a triangle by pen and paper method because these tools can do it for you? I guess your answer would be “no” because if your answer is “yes”, you risk a future where people would have forgotten all such knowledge and lost such skills which would instead be built into computer/software systems. A breakdown of such systems would leave you with no option to get back on track!

P.S. The idea for this post came after reading Are We Losing the Secrets of the Masters? This article also mentions about old books which described in detail design of magnets and electromagnets, making neon signs, silver printing, building a forge, blacksmithing etc. Some of these books can now be found here, here and here.  A PDF version of a 1896 book titled “Five Hundred and Seven Mechanical Movements” digitized by Google can be found here and associated websites on animation of engines are this and this.

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