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Archive for September, 2014|Monthly archive page

Chasing Numbers

In Education, Engineering Principles, Mathematics, Research and Development on September 28, 2014 at 8:35 PM

In his book The Tyranny of Numbers: Mismeasurement and MisruleNicholas Eberstadt says, “Although he may not always recognize his bondage, modern man lives under a tyranny of numbers.” Other writers have also commented on how and why numbers alone cannot make us happy and how numbers can be both enlightening as well as confusing if not presented with the right kind of background information. This is very true with research literature, specially those pertaining to engineering and science disciplines where measurement plays a very important role in conveying one’s ideas to convince someone of their importance. I see this everyday when I read research papers. Sometimes I even see numbers and graphs which seemingly do not have any major relation to the central idea of the paper. Such numbers, graphs and tables are byproducts of primary measurement but are probably included with the hope that more numbers, graphs etc. make the papers not only look good but also appear convincing. Given the very short amount of time that most reviewers spend on a paper, it is only sometimes that one finds reviewers commenting on the unnecessary usage of such secondary artifacts. However, a cursory glance does make the paper look good and does give the impression that the authors have spent time analyzing their results (though this may not be the case).

When I see such papers I am reminded of Eberstadt’s statement. It makes me wonder if engineering and science people read papers and books from the field of social science or history or say English literature. Research is conducted even in these disciplines and data is also collected and analysed where needed. However, the force of the argument generally comes from rigorous analysis and reasoning. It is not always driven by the logic that since this paper achieves number X compared to number Y (where say Y is less than X), the proposed methodology is better than the one related to number Y. I have read Diffusion of Innovation by Everett M. Rogers and I have found it to be immensely enlightening. It not only uses numbers but also the force of reasoning. This is so strong that you begin to see what the author is trying to say. I wonder how, say a computer engineering scientist would review a sociology research paper.

Have you ever tried reviewing a paper or a book outside of your major discipline and trying to understand its logical progression?

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