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Posts Tagged ‘Books’

How much and what do you read as a researcher?

In Education, Engineering Principles, Interdisciplinary Science, Research and Development on March 3, 2013 at 5:07 PM

What do you read as a researcher? Most of us read only that which is relevant (or we think is relevant) to our research. But is that all that is should be read? I know that many of us do read novels of different kinds of which fiction is more common.

However, as far as reading for research is concerned, most of us read within our specific domain and especially focusing on those works that are closely related to our own. We browse through conference proceedings and journals a lot. Some of us venture into reading patents and online newsletters published like EE Times  etc. Nevertheless we tend to stick to a rather narrow range of topics. We measure the utility of reading something for research against the value that it might bring, in our opinion, to our research. While this is not at all a bad way of doing research, we run the risk of training ourselves to read, think and argue about only a very narrow set of topics even within our own broader research discipline. It is a byproduct that has its negative consequences. It becomes difficult to think beyond what we are most comfortable with and it makes an expert in a very narrow field. We run the risk of not being able to relate our work with the bigger picture and processes. We run the risk of not being able to think at the system level or looking at the same thing from a different perspective. For instance, a mobile phone is a device that has both software and hardware. A software guy will describe it from software perspective while the hardware guy from hardware. Someone who can understand both, even if not every detail, can help merge the two perspectives which is very important for product design!

Oscar Wilde has said, “It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it“. It applies not only to life but also to research. Reading about human factors, user interfaces, intellectual property, regulatory practices etc. helps us in seeing same things from different perspectives. It is a great way to exercise our brains.

At the same time,if you are more adventurous , reading about topics in sociology, psychology, economics, politics etc. helps you develop critical thinking abilities borrowed from different domains. An example is here. And if you can see through all of this, you might even be able to solve a problem in your domain by reading about something exciting in another domain.