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Posts Tagged ‘Search engine’

Complementary to Google Search

In Education, Interdisciplinary Science, Research and Development on March 26, 2013 at 5:31 PM

When we look for information, almost all  of us invariably turn to Google. There is no doubt that Google and its services, especially its search engine, have helped many of us who look for both new and old pieces of information often. However, is it always the best in terms of returning results that are relevant to the search query? Not necessarily. By relevant, I mean the intention of the user who typed in the search query.  Given the fact that the Google page rank algorithm, among other things, assesses the importance of a page/resource based on the number of pages/resources linking to it and their importance as well, the search result tends to tilt in favor of  those resource which most people are talking about. Therefore the search result can include Wikipedia references, journal and magazine articles, Youtube videos etc. This means that there may not be a uniformly decreasing order of depth of information available in the search results. It may also mean that the quality and expanse of information available in the search results could vary widely. For instance, a news report that shows up higher on the list of search results could be discussing the outbreak of a particular disease and its economic and social impacts. It may not be discussing the medical science behind the disease itself. Of course one can try combinations of phrases as well as Google custom search to narrow down the results. This also means that if you are searching for something that is discussed rarely, you will have to sift through a lot of results. However, there is another way of looking for targeted information: use of field specific search engines. For example,  FindZebra  is a search engine for rare/orphan diseases. This is currently a research project at Technical University of Denmark  and it seeks to help doctors looking for information on such diseases for the purpose of medical diagnosis (an example of very targeted information). It indexes only the most relevant databases for this purpose.  Its comparison with Google search and Google custom search can be found here. Archives, like this one,  in different fields also serve the same purpose. It  will be better to see the two search approaches as complimentary to each other. While field specific search engines/archives can be very precise, Google search can provide a wider set of results where different perspectives and analyses may emanate on the same subject but from  people with different backgrounds.

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